Cold-pressed Neem Oil

Like olive oil, neem oil comes in different grades and prices. Diglings high-grade pure neem oil is cold-pressed from seeds of the neem tree with a high level of the active compound, Azadirachtin (3785 ppm). If you have not had good results with other neem oils, try this one for its higher efficacy.

BENEFITS

• Effective organic control of insect predators and fungal diseases.

• Emulsified for easy mixing – no need to mix with soap water.

• Economical – one 200 ml concentrated bottle makes 60 litres of solution; 500 ml makes 150 litres of solution. 

• Natural plant extract with organic sulfur, proteins, vitamins, glycerides and trace elements for improved plant health. Watch your plants green up and perk up within hours after drenching!

HOW TO USE

As a soil drench, dilute 1:300 (3 ml per litre water), and drench with a watering can once a week on leaves and roots. Gradually increase the water volume and neem oil amount in proportion as plant grows.

As a foliar spray, dilute 1:300 (3 ml per litre water), and spray until leaves are well coated. Spray every 3 days after 6 p.m., especially after rain.

Young and tender plants may be sensitive to neem oil – apply once and observe plant response before applying again.

NOTE
Not all neem oil is effective as a soil drench. Ready-to-use neem oil sprays contain a different type of neem oil, and only work as sprays. Be sure to read the labels for instructions. 

MINERAL ANALYSIS
Azadirachta indica seed cold-pressed oil 85%.

PRICE
RM 60 for 200 ml concentrate.
RM 120 for 500 ml concentrate.


SOME TIPS ON HOW TO USE

Instead of wrestling my body into contortionist poses to spray under the leaves, it’s easier to apply the neem oil as a soil drench. For severe infestation, I may foliar spray plus soil drench.

Soil drenching allows the plant to take up the active ingredient, Azadirachtin, via the roots and distribute it throughout the whole plant (systemic). When pests feeding on the leaves eat Azadirachtin, it inhibits their growth and suppresses their appetite. Besides whiteflies, Azadirachtin also controls 200 species of insect pests including aphids, caterpillars, fruit flies, leaf miners, thrips, as well as some fungal diseases.

Advantages of soil drenching vs. foliar spraying:

  • Easier to apply – simply dilute in a watering can and drench over the soil and leaves as if you are watering the plant.
  • Systemic whole-plant uptake of the active ingredient, Azadirachtin.
  • Neem oil sprayed on leaves gets washed off by rain, and degrade in sunlight. 
  • Controls soil nematodes, which tomatoes are prone.
  • Friendly to earthworms, bees and pets.

Whiteflies

If you grow tomatoes, eggplants or chillies, you may have noticed white fuzzy patches under the leaves. While they look like Christmas, these whiteflies can do a lot of damage by sucking the leaf sap, reducing photosynthesis, and carrying diseases to the host plant. For these reasons, it’s important to control the whitefly population because they are prolific breeders. Catch them early! For light infestation, I simply rub or blast them off with water. For heavy infestation, I reach for my neem oil. Instead of wrestling my body into contortionist poses to spray under the leaves, it’s easier to apply the neem oil as a soil drench. For severe infestation, I may foliar spray plus soil drench.

Caterpillars

Leafy stir-fry favourites like nai pak, pak choy and choy sum are prone to caterpillar damage when grown in an open environment. Putting a net over them is helpful, but I prefer to admire my veggies without a barrier. What I do is dilute and drench my cold-pressed neem oil with a watering can, once a week, in place of watering, all over the leaves and soil. This weekly routine has successfully kept caterpillars and other predators away. 

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